Being13th

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Home of Being13th

So the SEO thingy says 17 words is too LOW,

maybe i am just a man of few words did they think of that?
Yes, Being13th is a handle i have used on the internet for many many years.

No Being13th is not my real name, the fact name is used in the interest of protecting the not so innocent.
yes Friday the 13th is my favorite day, i am also a free mason.

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I ride a Harley, and listen to country music, gangster rap, and heavy metal. I also drive a truck and grew riding horses.

Although I now live in a large metropolitan city i grew up in the country of a very small rural town that they’ve written songs about.

I took the path of a rebellious teen a far as I could. Now i live a pretty simple life, I don’t drink or do drugs, I do like Cuban cigars and Vaping.

I syndicate several blogs through this site for fun more than anything. So you might find articles ranging from the far left to the far right and everything in between.

Now that the lil SEO thingy says I am good to go I can stop writting.

In order to truly being13th you must first embrace the 13th, first we can start with Friday the 13th. i take more chances on the 13th than any other day. why you ask? Because i’m Being13th, and 13 is my number, it is who i am. i even get tatoos on stratigic friday the 13th’s. while everyone else is walking around with their heads tucked down low, i walk with my head held high in revelance of the 13th.

True there are reasons one should fear the 13th, it is one of the most powerful numbers in numerology, and friday the 13th is associated with a lot of bad things.

 

Friday the 13th, ‘the most widespread superstition’

The sixth day of the week and the number 13 both have foreboding reputations said to date from ancient times. It seems their inevitable conjunction from one to three times a year (there will be three such occurrences in 2012, exactly 13 weeks apart) portends more misfortune than some credulous minds can bear. According to some sources it’s the most widespread superstition in the United States today. Some people refuse to go to work on Friday the 13th; some won’t eat in restaurants; many wouldn’t think of setting a wedding on the date.

The Devil’s Dozen

Although no one can say for sure when and why human beings first associated the number 13 with misfortune, the superstition is assumed to be quite old, and there exist any number of theories — most of which deserve to be treated with a healthy skepticism, please note — purporting to trace its origins to antiquity and beyond.

It has been proposed, for example, that fears surrounding the number 13 are as ancient as the act of counting. Primitive man had only his 10 fingers and two feet to represent units, this explanation goes, so he could count no higher than 12. What lay beyond that — 13 — was an impenetrable mystery to our prehistoric forebears, hence an object of superstition.

Which has an edifying ring to it, but one is left wondering: did primitive man not have toes?

Life and death

Despite whatever terrors the numerical unknown held for their hunter-gatherer ancestors, ancient civilizations weren’t unanimous in their dread of 13. The Chinese regarded the number as lucky, some commentators note, as did the Egyptians in the time of the pharaohs.

To the ancient Egyptians, we’re told, life was a quest for spiritual ascension which unfolded in stages — twelve in this life and a thirteenth beyond, thought to be the eternal afterlife. The number 13 therefore symbolized death, not in terms of dust and decay but as a glorious and desirable transformation. Though Egyptian civilization perished, the symbolism conferred on the number 13 by its priesthood survived, we may speculate, only to be corrupted by subsequent cultures who came to associate 13 with a fear of death instead of a reverence for the afterlife.

Anathema

Still other sources speculate that the number 13 may have been purposely vilified by the founders of patriarchal religions in the early days of western civilization because it represented femininity. Thirteen had been revered in prehistoric goddess-worshiping cultures, we are told, because it corresponded to the number of lunar (menstrual) cycles in a year (13 x 28 = 364 days). The “Earth Mother of Laussel,” for example — a 27,000-year-old carving found near the Lascaux caves in France often cited as an icon of matriarchal spirituality — depicts a female figure holding a crescent-shaped horn bearing 13 notches. As the solar calendar triumphed over the lunar with the rise of male-dominated civilization, it is surmised, so did the “perfect” number 12 over the “imperfect” number 13, thereafter considered anathema.

On the other hand, one of the earliest concrete taboos associated with the number 13 — a taboo still observed by some superstitious folks today, apparently — is said to have originated in the East with the Hindus, who believed, for reasons I haven’t been able to ascertain, that it is always unlucky for 13 people to gather in one place — say, at dinner. Interestingly enough, precisely the same superstition has been attributed to the ancient Vikings (though I have also been told, for what it’s worth, that this and the accompanying mythographical explanation of it are apocryphal). That story has been laid down as follows:

And Loki makes thirteen

Twelve gods were invited to a banquet at Valhalla. Loki, the Evil One, god of mischief, had been left off the guest list but crashed the party, bringing the total number of attendees to 13. True to character, Loki raised hell by inciting Hod, the blind god of winter, to attack Balder the Good, who was a favorite of the gods. Hod took a spear of mistletoe offered by Loki and obediently hurled it at Balder, killing him instantly. All Valhalla grieved. And although one might take the moral of this story to be “Beware of uninvited guests bearing mistletoe,” the Norse themselves apparently concluded that 13 people at a dinner party is just plain bad luck.

As if to prove the point, the Bible tells us there were exactly 13 present at the Last Supper. One of the dinner guests — er, disciples — betrayed Jesus Christ, setting the stage for the Crucifixion.

Did I mention the Crucifixion took place on a Friday?

Bad Friday

Some say Friday’s bad reputation goes all the way back to the Garden of Eden. It was on a Friday, supposedly, that Eve tempted Adam with the forbidden fruit. Adam bit, as we all learned in Sunday School, and they were both ejected from Paradise. Tradition also holds that the Great Flood began on a Friday; God tongue-tied the builders of the Tower of Babel on a Friday; the Temple of Solomon was destroyed on a Friday; and, of course, Friday was the day of the week on which Christ was crucified. It is therefore a day of penance for Christians.

In pagan Rome, Friday was execution day (later Hangman’s Day in Britain), but in other pre-Christian cultures it was the sabbath, a day of worship, so those who indulged in secular or self-interested activities on that day could not expect to receive blessings from the gods — which may explain the lingering taboo on embarking on journeys or starting important projects on Fridays.

To complicate matters, these pagan associations were not lost on the early Church, which went to great lengths to suppress them. If Friday was a holy day for heathens, the Church fathers felt, it must not be so for Christians — thus it became known in the Middle Ages as the “Witches’ Sabbath,” and thereby hangs another tale.

The Biblical story that Stevens is referring to is the Last Supper, where most of the Friday the 13th superstitions are rooted.

In the Bible, Jesus and his twelve disciples gathered for the Last Supper on Thursday. Judas is considered the 13th disciple, if you include Jesus. Judas betrayed Jesus and sold him to the Romans, leading to His crucifixion the next day, which was a Friday.

On Friday, October 13, 1307 (a date sometimes spuriously linked with the origin of the Friday the 13th superstition)[25][26] Philip ordered de Molay and scores of other French Templars to be simultaneously arrested. The arrest warrant started with the phrase : “Dieu n’est pas content, nous avons des ennemis de la foi dans le Royaume” [“God is not pleased. We have enemies of the faith in the kingdom”].[27] The Templars were charged with numerous offences (including apostasyidolatryheresy, obscene rituals and homosexuality, financial corruption and fraud, and secrecy).[28] Many of the accused confessed to these charges under torture, and these confessions, even though obtained under duress, caused a scandal in Paris. All interrogations were recorded on a thirty metre long parchment, kept at the “Archives nationales” in Paris. The prisoners were coerced to confess that they had spat on the Cross : “Moi Raymond de La Fère, 21 ans, reconnais que (J’ai) craché trois fois sur la Croix, mais de bouche et pas de coeur” (free translation : “I, Raymond de La Fère, 21 years old, admit that I have spat three times on the Cross, but only from my mouth and not from my heart”). The Templars were accused of idolatry.

 

Occurrence

The following months have a Friday the 13th:

Month Years Dominical
letter
January 1978, 1984, 1989, 1995, 2006, 2012, 2017, 2023 A, AG
February 1976, 1981, 1987, 1998, 2004, 2009, 2015, 2026 D, DC
March 1981, 1987, 1992, 1998, 2009, 2015, 2020, 2026 D, ED
April 1973, 1979, 1984, 1990, 2001, 2007, 2012, 2018 G, AG
May 1977, 1983, 1988, 1994, 2005, 2011, 2016, 2022 B, CB
June 1975, 1980, 1986, 1997, 2003, 2008, 2014, 2025 E, FE
July 1973, 1979, 1984, 1990, 2001, 2007, 2012, 2018 G, AG
August 1976, 1982, 1993, 1999, 2004, 2010, 2021, 2027 C, DC
September 1974, 1985, 1991, 1996, 2002, 2013, 2019, 2024 F, GF
October 1978, 1989, 1995, 2000, 2006, 2017, 2023, 2028 A, BA
November 1981, 1987, 1992, 1998, 2009, 2015, 2020, 2026 D, ED
December 1974, 1985, 1991, 1996, 2002, 2013, 2019, 2024 F, GF
The following years have Fridays the 13th in these months:

Year Months Dominical
letter
2001 April, July G
2002 September, December F
2003 June E
2004 February, August DC
2005 May B
2006 January, October A
2007 April, July G
2008 June FE
2009 February, March, November D
2010 August C
2011 May B
2012 January, April, July AG
2013 September, December F
2014 June E
2015 February, March, November D
2016 May CB
2017 January, October A
2018 April, July G
2019 September, December F
2020 March, November ED
2021 August C
2022 May B
2023 January, October A
2024 September, December GF
2025 June E
2026 February, March, November D
2027 August C
2028 October BA

This sequence given here for 2001–2028, follows a 28-year cycle from March 1, 1900 to February 28, 2100. The months with a Friday the 13th are determined by the Dominical letter (G, F, GF, etc.) of the year. Every month that begins on a Sunday will contain a Friday the 13th, and there is at least one Friday the 13th in every calendar year.

The longest period that can occur without a Friday the 13th is fourteen months, either from July to September the following common year (e.g. between 2001–02, 2012–13, and 2018–19), or from August to October the following leap year (e.g. between 1999-2000 or 2027–28).

Patterns for common years:

First month occurring Second month Third month
January October
February March November
April July
May
June
August
September December
Patterns for leap years:

First month occurring Second month Third month
January April July
February August
March November
May
June
September December
October

Each Gregorian 400-year cycle contains 146,097 days (365 × 400 = 146,000 normal days, plus 97 leap days) and they equal 146,097 days, total. 146,097 ÷ 7 = 20,871 weeks, and 400 × 12 = 4,800 months. Thus, each cycle contains the same pattern of days of the week (and thus the same pattern of Fridays that are on the 13th), but no day of the month up to the 28th can occur the same number of times on each day of the week (because 4,800 is not divisible by 7). The 13th day of the month is slightly more likely to be a Friday than any other day of the week.[16] On average, there is a Friday the 13th once every 212.35 (212 and 241/688) days.

The distribution of the 13th day over the 4,800 months is as follows:

Day of the week Number of occurrences
Sunday 687
Monday 685
Tuesday 685
Wednesday 687
Thursday 684
Friday 688
Saturday 684

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